GACE Political Science

The Political Science assessment, offered as part of the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators, is divided into two tests.

The first test consists of 60 selected-response questions. The content areas covered by the first test are institutions (national, state, and local), citizenship, and politics. The topics covered by the institutions subarea are: the structure and functions of United States institutions; and the structure and functions of Georgia institutions. The topics covered by the citizenship and politics subarea are: fundamental concepts of citizenship, elections, socialization, parties, interest groups, and the media.

The second test consists of 60 selected-response questions. The content areas covered by the second test are: the United States Constitution; civil rights, civil liberties, and criminal justice; and comparative politics and international relations. The United States Constitution subarea covers the Constitution and foundations of United States government. The topics covered by the civil rights, civil liberties, and criminal justice subarea are: fundamental concepts of civil liberties, civil rights, and criminal justice. The topics covered by the comparative government and international relations subarea are: historical and contemporary forms of government; international relations; and the formation and execution of American foreign policy.

The examination must be completed within four hours. Test-takers will receive performance indices indicating their success in each subarea of the examination. Scores will be available approximately a month after the date of the examination; unofficial results are posted on the internet, and an official score report is mailed to the test-taker, the Professional Standards Commission, and the institution specified by the test-taker during registration.

GACE Political Science Practice Questions

1. How many electors does each state receive in the Electoral College?

A: The state’s number of senators
B: A number proportionate to the population of the state
C: The state’s number of senators and representatives in Congress
D: Every state receives ten

2. Who is the most important member of the House of Representatives?

A: the Speaker of the House
B: the House whip
C: the Minority leader
D: the vice-president

3. Who appoints the members of the Supreme Court?

A: Senate
B: President
C: Chief Justice
D: House of Representatives

4. According to the Constitution, who has the power to levy taxes and spend the money of the government?

A: Congress
B: President
C: Senate
D: House of Representatives

5. How long is the term of a United States Senator?

A: Two years
B: Four years
C: Five years
D: Six years

Answer Key

1. C. Each state gets a number of electors equal to its senators and representatives in Congress (the District of Columbia has no representation but receives 3 electors).
2. A. The Speaker of the House is the leader of the majority party, and has a great deal of influence over the agenda of the House. In the event of a tie vote, the vice-president casts the deciding vote.
3. B. The President appoints the justices, who must then be approved by Congress.
4. D. The authors of the Constitution believed that the House would be the closest approximation of the people’s will.
5. D. Every two years, one-third of senate seats are up for election.

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